The Cinematography of “Fight Club” (1999)

The Cinematography of “Fight Club” (1999)
Cinematographer: Jeff Cronenweth
Nominated by the American Society of Cinematographers as one of the top 50 best shot films of the past decade

3 comments


  • JOn

    Super job Evan, I keep coming back to your site to check the latest films. You get such a better feel for the films visually from this grabs. Keep up the good work!! Jon

    July 7, 2010
  • […] Fight Club (1999) was Jeff’s first hand at assuming the position of Director of Photography for a feature film, and stands as a strong foundation and origin for what will later become Cronenweth’s strong visual style. In terms of themes and content Fight Club (1999) was controversially brutal and dark, and this is communicated comprehensively in Cronenweth’s photography. As a film, Fight Club (1999) is characterised by strong colour palettes, dim lighting with extensive use of shadows and an effective use of depth of field to keep deliberate details in focus. The parts of what make the film so attractive is how purposefully unattractive the DP has made everything seem. By affecting the intensity of colour and light Cronenweth creates a disturbed feeling that translates throughout the entire film. Altering the colour palette is a technique that Cronenweth will later come to perfect in his more recent work. In terms of camera movement, Cronenweth tends towards locked off shots or dolly movements, preferring to stay away from jibs/cranes and zooms, there is almost no handheld in the entire film. By keeping camera majorly static the light and dark becomes more intense and he develops a strong, visceral energy that characterizes the tone of the entire film. Compositionally the DP and director worked together to try and conceal the antagonist’s identity as being a projection of the protagonist’s mind by keeping him at the edge of frames or out of focus in the background. Many compositional elements were manipulated to achieve a semi-surreal and intentionally ugly film quality. (http://evanerichards.com/2010/548) […]

    June 5, 2013
  • […] film was shot by cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth, the son of American cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth, who is perhaps best known […]

    June 15, 2017

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